• 7th International Conference on Power Engineering, Energy and Electrical Drives IEEE 11th International Conference on Compatibility, Power Electronics and Power Engineering

    IEEE CPE-POWERENG 2017

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Program


The DEFINITIVE program of the IEEE CPE-POWERENG is now available. Click HERE to see the online version of the final program or download the simplified pdf version HERE

PLENARY SESSIONS
Plenary Session 1

Plenary Session 1

SPEAKER: Prof. Marco Liserre, Christian-Albrechts-Univeristy of Kiel (Germany)

TITLE: The Smart Transformer: impact on the electric grid and technology challenges

SUMMARY: The Smart Transformer, a power electronics-based transformer, can provide ancillary services to the distribution grids to support the grid management, in addition to the voltage adaptation. The Smart Transformer is a natural connection point for hybrid (AC and DC) grids both at MV and LV levels and is supposed to reach a market of US$204.3 million by 2020.
In this talk after the introduction of smart transformer, its topologies and control methods, the smart transformer possible services to the electric grid including the enabling power electronics technologies are investigated.

Plenary Session 2

Plenary Session 2

SPEAKER: Prof. Tobias Geyer, ABB Corporate Research, Switzerland

TITLE: High Power Electronics: Control Challenges and Opportunities

SUMMARY: Power converters in the Megawatt range are becoming an integral part of the modern power system. Examples include HVDC transmission systems, renewable energy generation, large variable-speed drives, STATCOMs, rail grid interties and pumped hydro storage systems.
These high power converters are operated at very low switching frequencies, require fast control loops and must often adhere to tight limits on their harmonic distortions. The typically used linear control methodology with pulse width modulation often impairs the achievable performance.
This talk provides an industrial perspective on high power electronics, summarizes their challenges and proposes novel control techniques to address some of them. Two pilot installations are discussed in detail including a 45 MW variable speed drive compressor system.